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Creative Writing Lesson Plans

This list of creative writing lesson plans continues my departure from some of the more motivational aspects of my website and delves into some teacher resources. This site contains over 1,000 creative writing prompts that can be crafted into many different lesson plans, and I hope that you'll consider trying some of them out. In the meantime, though, if you'd like to find some ideas for lessons independently of those prompts, I've come with a few winners here. If you check out this site, you'll learn that I'm not big into teaching "the craft" of writing and I'm more of a "freedom-based" teacher. You will see that philosophy reflected in these creative writing lesson plans. 

Creative Writing Lesson Plans 

1. Learn more about your classmates by interviewing one and writing a story based on that person's life. Pair up your students with partners they don't know very well to take full effect of the assignment. Give them free reign to write whatever kind of story they'd like.

2. Collect a random assortment of objects on your desk. Instruct your students to write a story that incorporates at least five of these items, but a story that isn't about any of those objects in particular. If you have a cup full of water on your desk, tell your students they can't write a story about a cup full of water.

3. For five minutes, have your students write a story about their day so far. After they have completed the story, instruct them to re-write the story in five minutes as if something crazy has happened earlier in the day and they are dealing with the aftermath. Lastly, have them re-write the story over the course of five minutes in a different style, such as a western, musical or horror movie. Share the stories and ask your students how the stories different from the originals.

4. Create five characters for your students by wearing five different hats or masks and talking in different voices. Have your students write a story with those five characters and then share them. Discuss how even using the same characters can lead to very distinct stories.

5. Have your students describe their favorite meal. Next, have them write a story in which a character completely unrelated to them eats the meal during a special occasion. Have the most popular stories re-enacted in front of the class at a later date, featuring the meal itself!

6. For one classroom, have your classroom change into a pitch meeting for a television sitcom. The people around the table must come up with the best possible ideas for an episode of television. Pick a popular show or make something up. If it makes sense for your class, have the scenario split into three different groups, with the rest of the class watching the "writers" duke it out followed by rotating in.

7. Have your students read a passage of Shakespeare. Then have them attempt to imitate his style in the form of a short story. Use this exercise to show them how much the English language has changed over time.

8. Give each of your students a different book and have them write a possible passage from the book simply by looking at the cover. Don't let them open the book or look at the back, just have them write.

9. Have your students write a story from your perspective about a day of your life. Make sure that they focus on areas aside from you teaching that particular class.

10. Give the students a few different premises from plots of "Twilight Zone" episodes, which usually come in the form of "a world of tiny people" or "forced to go back in time" plot. Have them create their own "what if" story, depicting the world in a strange or unusual way. 

I sincerely hope that these 10 creative writing lesson plans will be helpful in preparing your students for a lifetime of writing creatively. These imagination-focused activities should strengthen their muscles of creativity and can be repeated throughout the year. If you would like to use some creative writing prompts in your classroom take a look at my books, 1,000 Creative Writing Prompts and 500 Writing Prompts for Kids

Done with Creative Writing Lesson Plans? Go back to Creative Writing Prompts.

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Written by Bryan Cohen

Bryan Cohen is the author of more than 30 books, many of which focus on creative writing and blasting through that pesky writer's block. His books have sold more than 20,000 copies. You can find him on and Facebook.

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